Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image

nesbit17

nesbit17

By

May 17, 2017

Launching Listen to Lansing!

May 17, 2017 | By | No Comments

This project is a website showcasing the results of a study I am in the process of conducting with colleagues in the Michigan State Sociolinguistics Lab.  For this project, we are investigating language change in the Greater Lansing Area (Ingham, Eaton and Clinton counties). Analyzing the vowels produced by Lansing natives born between 1908 and 1997, my colleagues and I have been able to chart the decline of the local dialect spoken here in Lansing over a century of time.

Intended to be a resource for non-linguist audiences, this website provides (1) a general introduction to the dialect spoken in Michigan and the surrounding states, (2) a description of the research my colleagues and I have conducted and the results thereof including a graph showing the incremental decline in local dialect features, along with 5 second clips of speakers from each generation in our sample, and finally (3) resources, contact information and links to supplemental materials on language change in the United States are provided.

As for logistics, I created my website on GitHub, using a bootstrap theme as a base. The chart showing dialect decline was created using AMCharts’ online chart editor. The code for this chart was embedded into the HTML code of the main website. The data used for this chart was generated via acoustical analysis of the vowels produced by the speakers in my sample.  Vowel measurements were made and speakers were categorized according to sociolinguistic thresholds already established in the field of dialectology. The small sound files were spliced out of individual interviews using the phonetic software PRAAT and inserted into the website’s HTML code using the ‘source’ element.  Lastly, all supplementary material (published articles and websites) was embedded as hyperlinks into the HTML.

As stated earlier, this website is intended for those less familiar with linguistics who are interested in language change in Lansing and/or Michigan. It is also intended to act as a resource for those wishing to gain more knowledge about American dialects and/or language change in the United States.  Currently, I am working on adding two things to this site: (1) a map to the site that showcasing the representative Greater Lansing communities in our sample, and (2) a recording widget whereby visitors to the site can contribute to ongoing research by recording themselves speaking.  The site can be accessed through http://listentolansing.matrix.msu.edu/

 

 

nesbit17

By

March 1, 2017

Getting Back to the Basics: Reducing the Content of My Site

March 1, 2017 | By | No Comments

My original vision for this project was to make a website showcasing the work I have been doing in collaboration with my colleagues in the Sociolinguistics Lab at MSU.  We’ve been documenting speech in the Greater Lansing Area over the last few years and have come across some unexpected trends…speech in Lansing is moving away from the prototypical rust-belt dialect and towards a more western (maybe Californian) dialect!

The website was going to showcase these facts. My earlier vision also included showcasing the sociolinguistics literature and previous findings regarding the Michigan dialect, commenting on how variationists like myself usually differentiate between dialects.  This then turned into having to describe (socio)linguistic theory and Bill Labov and vowel formants and standardization and OMG.  Waaay too much information.

Needless to say, I had a talk with myself and decided that I should just stick to the facts.  The stuff people, linguists and non-linguists alike, care about.  So, for better or for worse, my website is much simpler than originally planned, but I think it’s for the best.  No one wants to read the equivalent of a novel when they visit a website, right? Right!

nesbit17

By

March 1, 2017

Slowly

March 1, 2017 | By | No Comments

I wrote this in January and never published it, so here goes anotha try

I’ve done away with Bootstrap and am giving it a go with HTML and CSS.  Everything is coming along… slowly but surely.  I wish I could globally change my sub-pages, but am not savvy enough to know how. Lots of copy/paste going on.  Still pondering a name for the website.  It’ll likely come to me in a dream.

nesbit17

By

February 3, 2017

Slowly Building My Website

February 3, 2017 | By | No Comments

I’ve done away with Bootstrap and am giving it a go with HTML and CSS.  Everything is coming along… slowly but surely.  I wish I could globally change my sub-pages, but am not savvy enough to know how. Lots of copy/paste going on.  Still pondering a name for the website.  It’ll likely come to me in a dream. Hopefully.

nesbit17

By

December 2, 2016

Workshopping: How to Model Variation

December 2, 2016 | By | No Comments

As a variationist sociolinguist, my research focuses on the way language varies and changes in communities of speakers and concentrates in particular on the interaction of social factors (such as a speaker’s gender, ethnicity, age, degree of integration into their community, etc) ModelingVariationand linguistic structures (such as sounds, grammatical forms, intonation features, words, etc). As such, when trying to visually represent and statistically model the effects of various variables, many a variationist has simply defaulted to a statistician, throwing in the towel and hanging our head in shame.

Thankfully, I think my field has found a savior and is finally able to walk out of the dark ages.  I attended a workshop at the latest conference I attended (NWAV 45) and learned how to model variation through the use of an interactive application built as a Shiny app with various statistical and graphical R packages (a programming language I am already quite familiar with).  The Language Variation Suite “allows one to handle imbalanced data, measure individual and group variation and rank variables according to their significance”.  The best thing about this suite is that it is easy to use and requiring minimal programming skills.  Much of the interface requires only a drag/drop process.

I am in the process of writing my second qualifying paper for my degree and have low-key been procrastinating because I have had no idea how to deal with the interaction of all the variables I care about.  This suite has come at the perfect time in my academic career and I can’t wait to try it out!

nesbit17

By

November 11, 2016

Project Musings

November 11, 2016 | By | No Comments

As the semester rolls on and we are tasked with trying to visualize our CHI projects, I am feeling a little stressed and inspired, all at the same time! As I’ve said before, my project is going to center around the research I’ve been conducting in the Sociolinguistics Lab in the Department of Linguistics and Languages, here at MSU.  For this project, we have been conducting and recording interviews with college freshmen at LCC and MSU and subsequently training them to interview their friends and family members.  The purpose of building this corpus is to document language change in the Greater Lansing Area. There are two reasons for having people interview their friends and family: (1) to gain less accessible participants and (2) to get a better picture of the social networks and upbringing of the college students.  These last two factors have shown to have insurmountable effects on ones choice to participate in a sound change and I’m hoping to drive this home somehow with my CHI project.  Thus far we have interview data from over 50 speakers ranging in birth date from 1908 to 1995! My initial idea for my CHI project was to create a website through which we could (1) gather more data – via some sort of recording interface whereby native Lansingites can record themselves reading some of the data samples and answer some of our demographic questions and (2) update the larger community (linguistic or otherwise) about our research and findings.  I am still a little unclear of how I am going to make the components of this project work, BUT I am inspired by the group projects that we did in LEADR two weeks ago.  For that project, we created a website that had a map and integrated way points onto the map that were related by some theme.  I’m thinking I can use this exercise to better visualize (1) where the speakers in our sample were born and raised, but also (2) to display how language in the area has changed over time.  In essence, I’d have way points for each birth place of a speaker and then perhaps another set of way points documenting where they moved.  It would also be nice to use a visualization tool to display familial and friendship relations within our sample.  Not sure how all of this will work, but I am very excited to figure it out.  To be continued…

 

nesbit17

By

September 30, 2016

Introducing Monica

September 30, 2016 | By | No Comments

MeHello! My name is Monica Nesbitt. I am a third year PhD student in Linguistics.   My research interests are in the subfields of phonetics, phonology, and sociolinguistics. More specifically, I am interested in probing the ways in which social and cognitive attributes effect speech perception and production and what their implications are for sound change. I am currently involved in documenting language change here in Lansing and am interested in utilizing the skills I will learn as a CHI fellow to create a repository of the interviews being conducted by myself and my collaborators.  Very excited to get started!