Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image

Uncategorized

Micalee Sullivan

By

March 10, 2011

The Digital Archive and Copyright Headaches

March 10, 2011 | By | 3 Comments

Undoubtedly, by now, there has been a lot written about the issue of copyrights and digitized archival material. Yet, I’m pretty sure no one has a definite answer for me yet. I came to Arizona to do some research this week and was determined to find an answer to this problem. In my “Sixteen Tons” project, I wanted to use pictures that I have taken in the archives of, not just archival photographs, but also actual documents. Allowing students to view high res photos of the actual documents gives them the opportunity to struggle with interpreting the faded, spotty, and outdated handwriting just as a historian would and can be much more interesting to view than just transcribed material on a word document.

But even posting photographs of these documents provides many of the same problems that using archival photographs does – problems that go beyond just crediting Read More

Katy Meyers

By

March 5, 2011

Announcing the GradHacker Bootcamp

March 5, 2011 | By | No Comments

We grad students at the CHI Initiative have been talking about what a great experience it is to be able to play with technologies in ways that many of us would never have attempted otherwise. We thought it would be great to be able to share in this experience with other graduate students who are interested in technology but have not yet had the chance to explore what’s out there. So, we decided to coordinate a CHI digital bootcamp for graduate students.

When: March 26th 8:30 to 3

Where: MATRIX 4th Floor Conference Room

Who: Any graduate or professional students

Why: To learn about technology in a collaborative and open environment with other graduate and professional students

This bootcamp will include roundtable discussions and demos on new Online Social Media like Twitter and LinkedIn, Reference and Collaboration Platforms like Zotero, and Personal Websites using WordPress or Drupal. We will also have an open play time where Read More

Micalee Sullivan

By

February 16, 2011

Teaching Digital Humanities to the Progressive Era Historian

February 16, 2011 | By | One Comment

Last week I made my first attempt at installing Omeka onto a server – my first step towards creating my Sixteen Tons project. Let’s just say I’m still in the process of completing this first step, but I am happy to have been given the opportunity to try a task that I would have never even attempted before becoming a CHI fellow. At times, I feel like the digital underdog, frantically Googling things like, “what does RT mean on Twitter?” (it means Re-Tweet!). But I am most likely not an exception to the wide array of professional historians out there.

Historians now recognize and value the importance of digital archive collections. While computers cannot replace cultural submersion experiences that many history graduate students are expected to participate in for their specializing region/s, I personally have benefited from the vast amount of primary documents that are a growing part Read More

Katy Meyers

By

January 28, 2011

Open Access Archaeology: Two Different Approaches

January 28, 2011 | By | 4 Comments

Archaeological site information is a precious commodity; once material is fully excavated it is the only knowledge we have of the site. After spending, years (or even decades) excavating a site the information can become packed away in a few notebooks or boxes, lost in the realm of gray material, and not uncovered until needed by another regional specialist or graduate student. Some information becomes a heavily guarded secret to prevent loss of material, either due to looting of the site or forced return due to NAGPRA. A third option now exists: make the information visible on the internet. This is the option that I am advocating for: open access archaeology.

One of the problems for archaeologists is that what we do, the process by which we build hypotheses, create inferences, and the methods for analyzing the materials we use are not understood by the general public. The media has portrayed archaeologists Read More

Micalee Sullivan

By

November 15, 2010

“Sixteen Tons”: A U.S. and South African Mineworkers’ Archive

November 15, 2010 | By | 7 Comments

It was not evident to me how little the world tends to remember about the story of the working class and labor history until I visited the De Beers Mining Museum in Kimberley, South Africa. The story of the mineworkers, their families, and their communities is hidden behind the celebrated legacy of a successful company and its founder Cecil Rhodes, whose “ambition, enterprise, and vision” helped to tame the “madness and mayhem” of the frontier. The mining museum does little to inform visitors of the dangerous and often deadly conditions that thousands of men partook in on a daily basis, and there is no tribute from De Beers honoring the countless workers lost while in the mines.

My CHI project, “Sixteen Tons”: A U.S. and South African Mineworkers’ Archive will tell the story of these workers, their families, and their communities by creating a public archive and online exhibit that documents Read More