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CHI Project Info

Jessica Yann

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February 17, 2017

Timeglider JS: moving right along

February 17, 2017 | By | No Comments

Construction of my timeline project is moving right along.  I have almost completely entered in all of the basic events, and have formatted the website into what it will basically look like. It is really coming together! I am using Timeglider JS as the framework for the timeline portion of my project and coding the rest of the pages with html/css. So far, it has been pretty easy to manipulate the basic components of Timeglider to enter in my own data points and re-do the icons (I’m pretty proud of my legend).  It has definitely been a learning process, but I think it will do what I want. Assuming I keep all my commas where they are supposed to be.

While the content is not yet as complete as it will be by the end of the project, I welcome feedback (just understand that nothing is yet in its final version!). You can view my timeline here.     Perhaps more importantly, I need a catchy title! Timeline of Michigan Archaeology is just too long. What do you think, internet? Take a peak through the site, then give me your feedback.  If I choose your title, I’ll give you an acknowledgement on my page! 🙂

 

 

mahnkes1

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February 9, 2017

Building the Project Narrative

February 9, 2017 | By | No Comments

As my project starts to move into a more intelligible form, I’d like to share a few of the new features on the beginning pages. Initially, my plan was to focus on three waves of Filipinx immigrants and where they settled in Michigan. Each wave would have its own page, showcasing movement and settlement. However, it meant an extensive pursuit of data, and to make room for time constraints and limited skill, I resolved to focus only on post-1965 groups since they seemed to be potentially informative for contemporary concerns of displacement and urban planning.

I’ve settled on two current Filipinx and Asian American spatially representative sites, and have started wrapping up analysis on the impact of one of them, but something about the accumulating narrative of the site still fell short for me. The pictures and stories of the first groups of APA immigrants kept coming back, providing a fuller arc in the discussion of what it means to be a citizen, and I realized this would be an important underlying consideration as users explore the later pages about continuous efforts to carve out space for cultures.

As a result, I created a beginning page with maps highlighting some of the first Filipinx immigrants’ residences in Ann Arbor and Detroit. By some stroke of luck, I managed to create a toggling button for seeing map layers of these residences by decade. Users would ideally be able to click on specific decades, gradually populating the map with the general areas of initial settlement. Markers are also written with popups that reveal the name, year registered in the Bureau of Insular Affairs, address, major/job, and school. If my luck persists, I hope to also overlay the maps with circled areas that represent urban development affecting residential areas. Populating these maps will take some time and the data will be nowhere near exhaustive, but it will provide an interesting portrait of the general areas of immigrant settlement.

Autumn Beyer

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February 9, 2017

Capturing Campus Cuisine: User Interaction

February 9, 2017 | By | No Comments

Following up on my previous blog about choosing an MSU theme for the Capturing Campus Cuisine webpage, this post will focus on the user interaction and experience. While the major sections of the webpage of this project had been previously decided, I was still not completely sure how I wanted the users to move through and interact with the site. After discussion with my partner on this project, Susan Kooiman, and the director of the Campus Archaeology Program, we decided to have the headers of the sections organized going from the themes of food practices, to our research methods used to learn about the various food practices, then the complete meal reconstruction conclusions, followed by the interactive atlas and additional resources. Read More

Nikki Silva

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January 31, 2017

How to Build the Directory of Oneota Scholars

January 31, 2017 | By | No Comments

In the past few weeks I have struggled to decide how I will build my database into my github pages site, without learning how to code SQL (structured query language), which would be difficult given the amount of time I have to complete this project. I was struggling with using Airtable as a front end developer and I think it will be easier to just create a template in the HTML for entries and fill in the information this way, while still using Airtable to house the information. I will pull from this file (like an online excel spreadsheet) to populate the directory. I will have the letters of the alphabet listed at the top of my Directory page, which will be anchored in the HTML to each section of scholars listed alphabetically by last name.

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Erin Pevan

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January 28, 2017

Circumnavigating the choppy waters of evidence gathering in Norwegian national literature

January 28, 2017 | By | No Comments

Recently, as I’ve begun to build my project and begin the first explorations of constructing the corpus of textual evidence through which I will examine national identity in Norway, I’ve been vexed with an epistemological challenge of using such evidence in my corpus that includes examples of literature, folklore, folk songs, and the like. Can such evidence provide solid, justified examples of meaning and knowledge based in truth, or is it a medium through which discourses of opinion provide problematic challenges in discerning fact from fiction? Well, thankfully, I’ve explored this issue before, and with recent input from the American Anthropological Association conference I attended this past November, I have found many ways in which cultural heritage research, and anthropological research in general, has made great use of the wealth of material that literature provides as evidence for such topics such as expressions of national identity. Read More

Jessica Yann

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January 27, 2017

Phase I: Developing my Timeline

January 27, 2017 | By | No Comments

Now that the new semester is here, I have finally begin to build my archaeological timeline of Michigan.  While not much has changed on the project website, I have been working steadily on collecting the necessary data to include.  You are welcome to view/keep tabs on my project development by going to my project development page here. Depending on when you check, there may or may not be a navigation bar at the top (that has been my most recent struggle).  I’m hoping to have the base pages created soon, with a navigation bar on all of them, and the timeline visible on the main page very shortly.  From there I can amend the events on the timeline and really start to add content.

Speaking of content, I’d like to say a bit regarding the type of information you can expect to see on my timeline.  After struggling a little trying to make decisions about just which archaeological sites to highlight, I decided it was important to highlight the most important sites in our state, which will be represented by those sites that have been listed on the National Register of Historic Places.  These are archaeological sites that have been determined to be nationally significant, that have yielded or may be likely to yield, information important in history or prehistory (you can see the criteria for listing here).  I will probably add a few additional sites that represent the earliest occupation of Michigan (these have not yet been nominated for listing).

Keep tabs on my project, comment on what you see, and enjoy! Just know that this is a living draft, that is always changing. I’m hopeful by my next blog post I will have started adding events and information to my page!

 

Autumn Beyer

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January 25, 2017

Capturing Campus Cuisine: Choosing a MSU Theme

January 25, 2017 | By | No Comments

Over the Winter break and into the beginning of this semester I  have been working on building and editing the framework for the Capturing Campus Cuisine website on the early food practices at Michigan State University. Following discussions with Susan Kooiman, my fellow Campus Archaeology fellow on this project and Dr. Goldstein, we wanted to have the website follow as close as possible to the historic colors and fonts used by the University. How is this even possible you ask? Well, there happens to be a webpage created by MSU specifically for these purposes! Check it out! Read More

Erin Pevan

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December 27, 2016

Rifling through a stack of books: Examining expressions of Norwegian national identity

December 27, 2016 | By | No Comments

In my last CHI blog post of 2016, I’ll discuss the next steps of my project, expanding from my last post regarding the visualization of cultural heritage and ethnographic topics to the overall scheme and vision of my own project on Norwegian national identity. As with most large scale and content heavy projects, mine has evolved over these several months to this current iteration that not only serves as the main component to my master’s thesis, but also as the platform from which I can launch further projects that involve my interests in Scandinavian culture heritage, language, and the use of technology as the medium through which I can explore these interests.  Read More

Nikki Silva

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December 16, 2016

Project Introduction: Directory of Oneota Scholars

December 16, 2016 | By | No Comments

Project Description:

My dissertation research focuses on Oneota populations living in Illinois. Artifacts attributed to the Oneota have been found primarily in Iowa, Wisconsin, and Minnesota. Because of the variety of Oneota sites and the different geographic areas where artifacts have been found, it is difficult to parse out who is currently studying or has previously studied the Oneota and what has been published on Oneota archaeology. For this years CHI Project I will create a website that serves as a directory of these scholars and lists their publications, areas of interest, and current institutions of employment. This directory will be used by graduate, undergraduate, and PhDs trying to find other scholars studying the Oneota.

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Jessica Yann

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December 9, 2016

Gliding through time!

December 9, 2016 | By | No Comments

Last time I described my idea for my CHI fellowship project, an interactive timeline on Michigan’s Archaeological history.  I have had plenty of time to play with this idea and test out several different means to try and get a functioning timeline on my web page.  I think I have finally decided on using Timeglider JS, as it looks like it will allow me to create the pop-ups and interactivity I am looking for.  Timeglider JS is a widget written in javascript that you use to create your timeline, then incorporate that into your web page.  I’ve tested it with dates from 14,000 years ago up through the present, and even tested the interactivity to a point. I believe it will do everything I am hoping for.

Now that I have decided how I’m going to accomplish my project, the next step is to accumulate the information to put into it.  During the coming semester, I am going to start compiling archaeological information on important sites and themes to include on my timeline, while figuring out how to best incorporate them into the timeline. Some of the major themes I am thinking of incorporating into the timeline include major environmental changes, faunal changes (i.e., demise of mammoths and mastodons), and then major technological changes (i.e., appearance of pottery, plant domestication, introduction of the bow and arrow).

While I can do this all on my own, I am also soliciting input from you all as well.  What do you see as the most important themes in Michigan Archaeology that should be included? What are your favorite archaeological sites?  What information do you think the general public would most benefit from having included? Let me know what you think!