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CHI Articles & Discussions

alex.galarza

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February 4, 2011

Collaboration in Zotero

February 4, 2011 | By | 2 Comments

I recently gave two workshops on Zotero to give an overview of its features, evangelize for its use, and to suggest models for collaboration that take advantage of group libraries. One workshop was conducted as a departmental lunch-and-learn for historians, and the other for librarians interested in Zotero’s sharing capabilities. Each group was excited by the examples of collaboration I provided and provided their own stimulating ideas on how they might use Zotero. Here are some examples from my own collaborate work that I showcased:

Fostering a Field

My first example was the group library I have assembled for the Football Scholars Forum, an academic monthly book club that invites authors via Skype to discuss their work. In the Zotero library, we have a folder that contains all of the sessions we have conducted so far, with attachments to each citation that include review essays, news stories, and the audio recording of the Read More

Katy Meyers

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January 28, 2011

Open Access Archaeology: Two Different Approaches

January 28, 2011 | By | 4 Comments

Archaeological site information is a precious commodity; once material is fully excavated it is the only knowledge we have of the site. After spending, years (or even decades) excavating a site the information can become packed away in a few notebooks or boxes, lost in the realm of gray material, and not uncovered until needed by another regional specialist or graduate student. Some information becomes a heavily guarded secret to prevent loss of material, either due to looting of the site or forced return due to NAGPRA. A third option now exists: make the information visible on the internet. This is the option that I am advocating for: open access archaeology.

One of the problems for archaeologists is that what we do, the process by which we build hypotheses, create inferences, and the methods for analyzing the materials we use are not understood by the general public. The media has portrayed archaeologists Read More

Katy Meyers

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December 27, 2010

The Gothic Ivories Project, a Digital Museum Exemplar

December 27, 2010 | By | 3 Comments

One of the primary advantages of hosting an archive online is that it can be revised and expanded from anywhere in the world by any number of individuals. This the approach chosen by such projects as “The Gothic Ivories” (http://www.gothicivories.courtauld.ac.uk). It serves as a repository where institutions from around the globe can post descriptions, images and discussions on these ivory pieces into a single digital museum. The project launched in October 2010, and consists of material from 98 institutions from 15 countries. The project allows for anyone with ivories to add to the collection, from public museums to private collectors.

Wikimedia Commons 2010: Courtly scenes Gothic Ivory

Gothic ivories were popular in Western Europe from the 13th to mid 16th centuries. They consist of small carved elephant ivory figurines, including miniature statuettes, mirror backs, diptychs and triptychs (two or three hinged tablets of images). The pieces are primarily carved Read More

Katy Meyers

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December 1, 2010

The Mourners: A Unique Digital Archive

December 1, 2010 | By | One Comment

With the growing use of Digital Humanities, the question is whether or not this online format can aid scholars in revealing anything new, what can technology allow us to do that we couldn’t before? How can technology aid us in moving beyond the traditional forms of study? Digital archives are becoming increasingly common, creating open access to sources that previously would have been unavailable to most scholars. Not only do these materials become widely available from anywhere, but they can also be widely interpreted. Most frequently digital archives are serving as online repositories for text, such as the Early English Books Online, which displays over 125,000 texts from 15th through 17th century Britain, or the current Google sponsored project to digitize the Dead Sea Scrolls. However, digital archives are not limited to text.

The Mourners (http://www.themourners.org) is an online museum exhibit sponsored by the Musée des Beaux-Arts de Dijon and the French Read More