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CHI Articles & Discussions

Ashley Wiersma

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November 28, 2012

THAT Camp Caribe and Current DH Conversations

November 28, 2012 | By | One Comment

“THAT Camp is like drinking from a fire hose.” – Organizer Marta Rivera Monclova on the first day of workshops.

I can attest to the truth of that! I just returned from my first THAT Camp, and I’m still trying to process the many conversations in and out of sessions and what I learned there. I arrived feeling like a freshman on a college campus but quickly discovered that although I have much to learn, I wasn’t as clueless as I thought.

This post highlights some of the hot topics and provides a glimpse into the state of the digital humanities (DH) as of mid-November 2012. In addition to the usual questions and tutorials on DH tools, issues of collaboration, open access, and whether or not coding is an essential skill in DH were the focus of many discussions.

Collaboration: Many of us in the digital humanities have big goals and to accomplish Read More

fayana.richards

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September 1, 2012

The End is Only the Beginning for QUALANTH: A Digital Repository for Qualitative Researchers

September 1, 2012 | By | No Comments

When conceptualizing QUALANTH, I wanted to build a digital repository for researchers, like myself, who work with human research participants. Over the past year, I have tackled issues around privacy, protection of human subjects, IRB and consent form and tried to embody these issues when designing QUALANTH but this work is far from over. An overview about QUALANTH is available here.

Over the past 2011-2012, I was able to complete Phase One of QUALANTH, which basically entailed constructing the backend of the repository. There are a few issues that need to be addressed before QUALANTH can be launched publicly. Phase Two will consist of me actively seeking evaluation and critiques of QUALANTH, as a physical product and conceptually, from outside peers. I plan to continue to write blog posts about QUALANTH as well as seek out opportunities to present about the digital platform at anthropology conferences. After gathering feedback about QUALANTH, Read More

fayana.richards

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July 12, 2012

2012 Allied Media Conference: A First Timer’s Thoughts

July 12, 2012 | By | No Comments

From June 28th to July 1st, I had the opportunity to attend my first Allied Media Conference in Detroit, Michigan. The conference is put on by the Allied Media Projects (AMP), an organization dedicated to developing media strategies ‘for a more just and creative world’ by drawing on disciplines such as technology, education, and communications. AMP is also one of the founding members of Detroit Digital Justice Coalition, which is comprised of organizations dedicated to ‘activities that are grounded in the digital justice principles of: access, participation, common ownership, and healthy communities’.

This year, the Allied Media conference drew around 2,000 attendees. While the overall framework for the conference was social justice, the organizers divided the sessions into tracks, such as Web making, Analog Media, and Imagining Better Futures Through Game Design and Play. The conference also featured practice spaces, such as the Media-A-Go-Go Hands-on Technology space, where attendees had the chance Read More

Emily Niespodziewanski

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July 11, 2012

Building a mobile app as a novice: tools review

July 11, 2012 | By | No Comments

Going into building TALUS, I had minimal understanding of programming. Maybe in the 90s, I learned that if you surround text with <b> and </b>, that text will be bolded. And something about the existence of a hexadecimal number code system (weird). But that was pretty much it.

However, as a consumer, I feel more knowledgeable. I can tell the difference between a smoothly functioning app and a crappy one. I’ve noted broad trends in the evolution of internet and mobile aesthetic. Of course, most self-aware consumers can say the same things. And none of that vague understanding meant that I could make anything at all. One of the most basic obstacles I faced was not knowing how different programming and mark-up languages interacted with each other.

If you’re starting from the ground up, like I was, you may not know about the W3schools tutorials. They are an easy way to learn the Read More

Rachael Hodder

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May 29, 2012

Dismantling the Troubling Monolithic Representation of Coding in the Humanities

May 29, 2012 | By | No Comments

Coding in the humanities has been the topic of much heated discussion. The conversation has spanned the shoulds-and-should-nots, the whys-and-why-nots, and the who-and-who’s-nots. What troubles me most about the conversations surrounding coding in the humanities is that the notion of coding is constructed as almost monolithic which dangerously lends to the construction of Coding, Coders, and Coding Culture wherein all Coders have ascended some pre-determined set of skill markers to attain the same knowledge, skills, and motives. The fact of the matter is that this just isn’t true – people code in a variety of different programming and markup languages at varying skill-levels to accomplish any number of goals and aims. This monolithic representation of Code is damaging to both people who build on the web and aspiring builders; it creates a tense climate and alienates potential teachers from new/potential learners, making the literacies, skills, and rationale involved in coding even Read More

fayana.richards

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May 28, 2012

Race in DH, Postcolonial Studies & Digitizing Chinese Englishmen: Interview w/ Adeline Koh

May 28, 2012 | By | No Comments

This following post is an interview that I recently conducted with Adeline Koh, Assistant Professor of Post Colonial Studies at Richard Stockton College. With a PhD in Comparative Literature, Koh’s research interests include global feminisms, British, Southeast Asian and African literature and the digital humanities. During the 2012-2013 academic year, Koh will be a visiting faculty fellow at Duke University with the Humanities Writ Large Program. The following interview is largely comprised of Koh’s interests around the topic of Race in the Digital Humanities and her two digital projects, The Stockton Postcolonial Studies Project and Digitizing ‘Chinese Englishmen’.

FR: So, tell me about your research interests and background.

AK: I work in the intersections of postcolonial studies and the digital humanities. I am trying to see how the digital world can change how we see the postcolonial world.

I’m actually working on a project based on my dissertation project. It’s called ‘Cosmopolitan Whiteness and Read More

Charlotte Marie Cable

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May 26, 2012

Social Media and Digital Life in Oman 2: “شوي شوي”

May 26, 2012 | By | No Comments

Social Media and Digital Life in Oman 2: “شوي شوي”

This post begins were the previous post left off: exploring the potential for social media in Oman, particularly as a forum for cultural heritage education, research, and outreach. Specifically, I am interested in considering the ways in which different social media may be leveraged (or created) for Omani cultural heritage.

I had pinned my hopes on an upcoming trip to the Sultanate in June, during which my colleagues and I were to come together with certain department heads of the National Ministry of Heritage and Culture to discuss the future – research, education, outreach, and general development – of Bat. I wanted to brainstorm about digital projects already incorporated into Ministry infrastructure and outreach – and (as I mentioned in my last post) most of these conversations are best done face-to-face. Although many Omanis (and all Ministry employees) have email accounts, in my Read More

fayana.richards

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March 12, 2012

A Slim Purview into Digital Medical Anthropology

March 12, 2012 | By | No Comments

Twitter has proven to be an extremely useful platform for learning about current medical anthropology research, call for proposals, and related digital projects. As an emerging scholar, it has also been the place where I have been able to interact with senior anthropologists. On Twitter, medical anthropologists such as Lance Gravlee, David Simmons and Hannah Graff. With that being said, medical anthropology graduate students outpaces the number faculty and/or applied medical anthropologists on Twitter.

In terms of blogging platforms featuring a significant amount of medical anthropology related content, Somatosphere and Neuroanthropology post content regularly. A multi-individual driven effort, Somatosphere features content covering areas such as bioethics, medical anthropology, science, and psychiatry. A significant amount of its contributors are either graduate students and/or early career academics. Neuroanthropology, hosted by PLoS, examines the intersections of anthropology and neuroscience and is maintained by anthropologists Daniel Lende and Greg Downey.

Medical anthropology digital project contributions are Read More

Rachael Hodder

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February 23, 2012

Chewing on Digital Rhetoric

February 23, 2012 | By | No Comments

“What does a digital rhetorician do?”
“What is digital rhetoric?”
“What is rhetoric?”

To most people outside my field, it’s not immediately obvious what my field of study means or what I do. As a degree candidate in Digital Rhetoric and Professional Writing, I hear these questions often from my friends, family, even some of my own colleagues! As rhetoricians, my colleagues and I are often concerned with these types of epistemological questions and end up deeply entrenched in these what does it all mean rabbit holes.

Certainly, we can be sure of some things: many of us are humanists and writers; we live in writing programs such as English or literary-type disciplines or communication programs; more often than not, we’re trained in those types of programs. Because we’re located in different places from university to university, there is some ambiguity over the location of rhetoric. Rhetoric is defined by one of those long-dead Greek Read More

Emily Niespodziewanski

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February 16, 2012

(Digital) State of the Field: Physical Anthropology

February 16, 2012 | By | 2 Comments


Image credit Flickr user karen_roe

Social media is largely overlooked by physical anthropologists. This is due in part to the nature of the data that goes into research. Someone studying vitamin A deficiency in infants in relation to the mother in Kenya does not need to use social media to interview or retrieve the blood nutrient levels of her research participants. Likewise, as I mentioned in an earlier post, forensic anthropologists in particular are constrained by ethics and the sensitive nature of the cases they work on.

Leading academic institutions in this field have yet to embrace the public outreach power of tools like Twitter, but this is changing slowly. At the same time, many graduate students (and some more senior academics) use Twitter personally and professionally to network. A good faculty role model would be @JohnHawks: this paleoanthropologist blogs, he’s engaged with the online community via Read More