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nesbit17

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March 1, 2017

Getting Back to the Basics: Reducing the Content of My Site

March 1, 2017 | By | No Comments

My original vision for this project was to make a website showcasing the work I have been doing in collaboration with my colleagues in the Sociolinguistics Lab at MSU.  We’ve been documenting speech in the Greater Lansing Area over the last few years and have come across some unexpected trends…speech in Lansing is moving away from the prototypical rust-belt dialect and towards a more western (maybe Californian) dialect!

The website was going to showcase these facts. My earlier vision also included showcasing the sociolinguistics literature and previous findings regarding the Michigan dialect, commenting on how variationists like myself usually differentiate between dialects.  This then turned into having to describe (socio)linguistic theory and Bill Labov and vowel formants and standardization and OMG.  Waaay too much information.

Needless to say, I had a talk with myself and decided that I should just stick to the facts.  The stuff people, linguists and non-linguists alike, care about.  So, for better or for worse, my website is much simpler than originally planned, but I think it’s for the best.  No one wants to read the equivalent of a novel when they visit a website, right? Right!

nesbit17

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March 1, 2017

Slowly

March 1, 2017 | By | No Comments

I wrote this in January and never published it, so here goes anotha try

I’ve done away with Bootstrap and am giving it a go with HTML and CSS.  Everything is coming along… slowly but surely.  I wish I could globally change my sub-pages, but am not savvy enough to know how. Lots of copy/paste going on.  Still pondering a name for the website.  It’ll likely come to me in a dream.

swayampr

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February 27, 2017

Working out NorrisTown!

February 27, 2017 | By | No Comments

In the last month, I have begun putting the innards of my website together. Unsurprisingly it was difficult. But I am happy to report some progress! At this point, I am working towards making a page that whose format I would like to replicate in the other pages. In other happy news, I was able to procure some archival material (thanks to the internet and sagacious archival staff at Cornell University and the National Archives in Atlanta), seminal to my project.

In working out a page format I liked, I first went to a front end platform like Bootstrap. Unfortunately, what I wanted needed too many changes to the template. So I just began working ground-up. As someone new to JavaSript and CSS, I prefer to have everything at one place. It might be a slightly archaic way of working and definitely pedantic, but it’s the one way I am able to work on ‘website stuff’ without having to work again on a separate CSS file etc.

Broadly speaking the website will have five sections: about; ‘Norris: A Utopia’; ‘Understanding Norris’; ‘Photographing Norris’; ‘Company Towns in America’. Each of these sections will further have a drop down menu listing out sub-sections.

The section exploring Norris as a utopia will explore the imaginations that understood Norris as a utopia. It will explore the utopian nature of Norris through newspaper clippings, material generated by the TVA to justify Norris and extoll its virtues, press releases, and essays/commentary by architects and planners of Norris (this is where the Earle Draper papers would feature heavily).

Housing in Norris was based on typologies. The next section, ‘Understanding Norris’ will trace the rationale of the housing typologies, the housing typologies themselves and relating the typologies to plans, elevations and housing types.

As an important infrastructural project the Norris Dam was important for the TVA in many ways. As a project undertaken during the Great Depression, the Norris Dam and the town of Norris were photographed extensively by the Farm and Security Administration (FSA)- Office of War Information[1]. The photographs are available at the Library of Congress website. The next section then will showcase the FSA photographs, in addition to photographs of Norris from newspapers etc.

Lastly, Norris was company town. The last section will examine briefly, a history of company towns in the United States through essays and book sections. This section will also showcase further sources that readers can access on company towns.

On a personal note, I have begun to work in and through GitHub, a platform that has been giving me nightmares for many months now!

The page format I am veering towards is here . I would really appreciate any feedback you might have!

Also, I am really looking for a fun title. I welcome all ideas!!

[1] For more see http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/fsa/

Nikki Silva

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February 24, 2017

Directory of Oneota Scholars: Criteria for Inclusion

February 24, 2017 | By | No Comments

As I’ve worked on building my corpus of scholars for the Directory of Oneota Scholars, I’ve realized that I need more than just one page to house information on scholars. I will create a drop down menu with four page options: Academics/Professionals, Graduate Students, Emeritus, and Deceased. The Academics/Professionals page will have individual scholars employed in university settings and those working for CRM firms and in museums. The Graduate Students page will have graduate students currently pursuing Master’s degrees and PhDs. The ‘Emeritus’ page will include individuals who were once employed in an academic setting but have since retired and the ‘Deceased’ page will include individuals who are deceased, but their work remains important in Oneota archaeology.

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Erin Pevan

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February 24, 2017

An organized chaos of Ngrams, corpora, and theory

February 24, 2017 | By | No Comments

At this point in my project exploring Norwegian national identity in literature over time, there is not much to report other than my continued progress knee-deep into the different pieces of my project. Over the past several weeks, I have been delving into different visualization tools to illustrate trends in national identity in Norway over time, and Ngram viewers (such as Google Ngram Viewer and Culturomics Bookworm, as well as a new fun Ngram discovery from the Norwegian Nasjonalbibliotekets Språkbanken repository) are the tools I am currently testing as my visualization for these trends.
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nelso663

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February 18, 2017

Querying the Collection of the British Museum for Propositional Objects

February 18, 2017 | By | No Comments

As I mentioned last month, one of the ideas of the semantic web is to render data from specialized, disparate sources comparable, and this is achieved by developing specifications like CIDOC-CRM. One implementation of CIDOC-CRM is the Erlangen CRM. Heritage institutions like the British Museum use implementations like this to organize their collection. It is implemented in the Web Ontology Language (OWL) and can be browsed in an ontology explorer like Protégé or by just reading the XML.

The CIDOC-CRM includes a class called Conceptual Object. Conceptual Object is a subclass of Man-Made Thing and a superclass of both Propositional Object and Symbolic Object. I’m particularly interested in exploring the Propositional Object class, which includes

“immaterial items, including but not limited to stories, plots, procedural prescriptions, algorithms, laws of physics or images that are, or represent in some sense, sets of propositions about real or imaginary things and that are documented as single units or serve as topic of discourse” (CIDOC-CRM, n.d.).

According to the documentation, a set of exemplary instances of this class are the common plot points of Kurosawa’s The Seven Samurai and Sturges’ The Magnificent Seven. A query to a SPARQL endpoint in order to materialize that collection’s Propositional Objects might read as follows:

# declare a prefix
# this allows us to refer to objects in the schema directly rather than by their full URI
# e.g., in the query below, crm:E89_Propositional_Object rather than the full URI http://erlangen-crm.org/current/E89_Propositional_Object
PREFIX crm: <http://erlangen-crm.org/current/>

# specify:
# a) the variable that the server should return (?instance)
# b) that the server should return unique instances only (with the DISTINCT modifier)
SELECT DISTINCT ?instance
# specify the pattern for the server to try to match
WHERE { 
 ?instance a crm:E89_Propositional_Object 
}
# state how the response should be ordered…
ORDER BY ?instance
# and the quantity of instances to limit the response to
LIMIT 100

Applying this query to the British Museum’s SPARQL endpoint returns 100 instances of Propositional Object, including Afghan Studies, Annual Reports, and Annual Review of the Royal Inscriptions of Mesopotamia Project.

Find the British Museum’s SPARQL endpoint and some helpful examples here.

Jessica Yann

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February 17, 2017

Timeglider JS: moving right along

February 17, 2017 | By | No Comments

Construction of my timeline project is moving right along.  I have almost completely entered in all of the basic events, and have formatted the website into what it will basically look like. It is really coming together! I am using Timeglider JS as the framework for the timeline portion of my project and coding the rest of the pages with html/css. So far, it has been pretty easy to manipulate the basic components of Timeglider to enter in my own data points and re-do the icons (I’m pretty proud of my legend).  It has definitely been a learning process, but I think it will do what I want. Assuming I keep all my commas where they are supposed to be.

While the content is not yet as complete as it will be by the end of the project, I welcome feedback (just understand that nothing is yet in its final version!). You can view my timeline here.     Perhaps more importantly, I need a catchy title! Timeline of Michigan Archaeology is just too long. What do you think, internet? Take a peak through the site, then give me your feedback.  If I choose your title, I’ll give you an acknowledgement on my page! 🙂

 

 

mahnkes1

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February 9, 2017

Building the Project Narrative

February 9, 2017 | By | No Comments

As my project starts to move into a more intelligible form, I’d like to share a few of the new features on the beginning pages. Initially, my plan was to focus on three waves of Filipinx immigrants and where they settled in Michigan. Each wave would have its own page, showcasing movement and settlement. However, it meant an extensive pursuit of data, and to make room for time constraints and limited skill, I resolved to focus only on post-1965 groups since they seemed to be potentially informative for contemporary concerns of displacement and urban planning.

I’ve settled on two current Filipinx and Asian American spatially representative sites, and have started wrapping up analysis on the impact of one of them, but something about the accumulating narrative of the site still fell short for me. The pictures and stories of the first groups of APA immigrants kept coming back, providing a fuller arc in the discussion of what it means to be a citizen, and I realized this would be an important underlying consideration as users explore the later pages about continuous efforts to carve out space for cultures.

As a result, I created a beginning page with maps highlighting some of the first Filipinx immigrants’ residences in Ann Arbor and Detroit. By some stroke of luck, I managed to create a toggling button for seeing map layers of these residences by decade. Users would ideally be able to click on specific decades, gradually populating the map with the general areas of initial settlement. Markers are also written with popups that reveal the name, year registered in the Bureau of Insular Affairs, address, major/job, and school. If my luck persists, I hope to also overlay the maps with circled areas that represent urban development affecting residential areas. Populating these maps will take some time and the data will be nowhere near exhaustive, but it will provide an interesting portrait of the general areas of immigrant settlement.

Autumn Beyer

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February 9, 2017

Capturing Campus Cuisine: User Interaction

February 9, 2017 | By | No Comments

Following up on my previous blog about choosing an MSU theme for the Capturing Campus Cuisine webpage, this post will focus on the user interaction and experience. While the major sections of the webpage of this project had been previously decided, I was still not completely sure how I wanted the users to move through and interact with the site. After discussion with my partner on this project, Susan Kooiman, and the director of the Campus Archaeology Program, we decided to have the headers of the sections organized going from the themes of food practices, to our research methods used to learn about the various food practices, then the complete meal reconstruction conclusions, followed by the interactive atlas and additional resources. Read More

nesbit17

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February 3, 2017

Slowly Building My Website

February 3, 2017 | By | No Comments

I’ve done away with Bootstrap and am giving it a go with HTML and CSS.  Everything is coming along… slowly but surely.  I wish I could globally change my sub-pages, but am not savvy enough to know how. Lots of copy/paste going on.  Still pondering a name for the website.  It’ll likely come to me in a dream. Hopefully.