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2016 September

nelso663

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September 30, 2016

Presenting Michael!

September 30, 2016 | By | No Comments

Hi there, CHI community. I’m Michael Nelson, and I’m really excited to be a part of this cohort. I’m in my second year of the master’s program in Media and Information at MSU’s Department of Media and Information. After watching movies and eating food, I’m most interested in exploring scholarly communication and knowledge management. I’m currently exploring those latter two topics in research for my master’s thesis and in other projects at my college. I also enjoy project-based work on these topics, as I found this past summer working at the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research as part of the University of Michigan iSchool’s Research Experience for Master’s Students program.

In short, I’m enthusiastic about these topics both as a researcher and as a practitioner.

Right now, I’m thinking my project might involve following up on some coursework I’ve done in the field of information and communication technologies (ICTs) for development (the field commonly known as ICTD or ICT4D). I’m especially interested in ICTD projects that have been applied in the context of indigenous knowledges.

My interests are informed by the work I did as an undergraduate and the work I’ve done since then. Studying history at North Park University in Chicago, I became especially interested in knowledge production, specifically knowledge in the human sciences. Then, the ups and downs of working at a startup investment fund and subsequently at a Chicago high school during the years between undergraduate and graduate study spurred my interest in returning to school in the domain of information science.

Looking forward to collaborating with and learning from other Fellows this year, and also to discussing all that right here on this blog with the CHI community!

nesbit17

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September 30, 2016

Introducing Monica

September 30, 2016 | By | No Comments

MeHello! My name is Monica Nesbitt. I am a third year PhD student in Linguistics.   My research interests are in the subfields of phonetics, phonology, and sociolinguistics. More specifically, I am interested in probing the ways in which social and cognitive attributes effect speech perception and production and what their implications are for sound change. I am currently involved in documenting language change here in Lansing and am interested in utilizing the skills I will learn as a CHI fellow to create a repository of the interviews being conducted by myself and my collaborators.  Very excited to get started!

 

Jessica Yann

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September 30, 2016

Introducing Jessica

September 30, 2016 | By | No Comments

Hello all!

My name is Jessica Yann. I am a PhD candidate in the Department of Anthropology. My focus is archaeology, specifically of the Midwestern region with an emphasis on the late 18th and early 19th centuries.  I am currently working on finishing up my research and analysis for my dissertation.

683My dissertation research focuses on how Native Americans and British traders were interacting throughout the Great Lakes region from 1760 to 1820, which is sometimes referred to as the ‘British period’ in the history of this region.  Specifically, I am looking at the choices that various groups were making regarding what goods to get from traders as well as who groups were choosing to trade with.  I am examining issues of supply and demand to test notions of dependency.  Many early research on this time period and topic claim that Native Americans became completely dependent on Europeans.  By looking more closely at supply and demand, I can examine these notions of dependency, and get a better idea of what was actually happening during these trade interactions. [Spoiler alert: I don’t think Native Americans were ever ‘dependent’ on Europeans, in the sense that they could not survive without them. I’m investigating this.]

All of that said, I am really excited to be working with CHI this semester.  I’m not sure that my project will relate specifically to my research, but I really love the idea of making archaeology more approachable and accessible to the public, so my project will probably revolve around that.  As my project develops, I will keep you all posted!

swayampr

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September 30, 2016

Introducing Ramya

September 30, 2016 | By | No Comments

Hi! I am Ramya, a first year graduate student in History at Michigan State. I am broadly interested in borderlands history, urban history and environmental history (specifically water). I come to history from an inter-disciplinary background in Journalism, Political Science, Science Technology Studies and most recently, Urban Design. I recently completed a Master’s thesis positing the idea of a political border as infrastructure (most of my thesis is available at here), using the case study of the Detroit River

 DSC_0463My proposed doctoral project aims to understand the relationship between a political border and urban form. I view the urban and environmental history of the US Canada border along the Detroit River as a critically under-researched topic. Through an exploration of the relationship between urban history and the political border, I want to explore a more bottom up way of envisioning and analyzing the border. Extant work on the US Canada border has analyzed the changing relationship of the two countries (especially post 9/11). However, there is little or no work on the Detroit Windsor border linking city growth with the formation of the US-Canada border.

My proposed project for the Cultural Humanities Informatics Fellowship aims to map the Underground Railroad vis-à-vis changes in urban form on both sides of the Detroit River border between the United States and Canada through the 19th century. Thus far, scholarly work on the Underground Railroad has been focused on important actors and events. In relating growing urban areas on both sides of the Detroit River with the Underground Railroad through the 19th century, I aim to spatialize the operation of the Underground Railroad.  By tracing the relationship of infrastructure (i.e. technology, people and places) of the Underground Railroad to the growth of urban areas on both sides of the Detroit River, I aim to move beyond traditional scholarship on the subject. I see this project folding into my larger dissertation that aims to examine the relationship between city growth and border making, particularly of Detroit and Windsor.

One of my motivations in applying to MSU is the tremendous support offered to digital humanities. I am very excited to be a part of such an inter-disciplinary cohort and look forward to learning from my peers!

pebbles1

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September 30, 2016

First Year: New adventures

September 30, 2016 | By | No Comments

Hello! O’siyo! Konichiwa!
My name is Kenlea Pebbles, and I am one of the fellows in the Cultural Heritage Informatics cohort at Michigan State University (MSU). I am one of two of the Writing, Rhetoric, and American Culture (WRAC) fellows in this year’s cohort. I am looking forward to everything we will be learning and producing this year.

This is my first year in the Ph.D. program in WRAC. I will be focusing on cultural rhetorics and linguistics in the Writing and Rhetoric program. I have a strong interest in: environmental rhetorics, feminist rhetorics, visual rhetorics, Native American and Indigenous rhetorics, digital rhetorics, and a plethora of other topics. In particular, I am interested in how linguistics and cultural rhetorics intercept and overlap.

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mahnkes1

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September 30, 2016

Fellow Introduction

September 30, 2016 | By | No Comments

Hello! I’m Stephanie Mahnke, a second-year PhD student in Writing, Rhetoric, and American Cultures. I got my undergraduate degree in English Literature at UCLA, but after that, I spent many years abroad and working at community colleges. It was during that break between undergrad and grad that I developed interests in community-building and the rhetorical power of places/spaces. As a PhD student, my main research interests include Filipinx rhetorics, the rhetoric of place/space, identity-place inter-relationships, and network and mapping theories. More specifically, I focus on critical understandings of place as rhetoric as a means of support for civic purposes and sustaining cultural histories.

denver (2) My research has revolved around cultural geographies, particularly how physical sites work toward cultural memory/forgetting. Recent work has included analysis of cultural sites in Egypt, Atlanta and Las Vegas. My work and place/space lens has also lent contribution to other area studies, such as collaboration with a Las Vegas environmental group which sought public participation for conservation efforts. This research ultimately leads to my current work on how nostalgia and culture are sustained in Filipinx communal spaces in their new host countries. The results of such a study, I believe, works to sustain cultural narratives but also reveal the hidden geographies of underrepresented cultures such as those in the Filipinx and Asian American Midwest communities. My hope is to eventually use digital spaces as repositories and engaging platforms to represent the place data in rich, highly accessible, non-linear formats such as interactive maps and networks. Being a CHI fellow brings me closer to that realization, and I’m very excited to work alongside such a brilliant cohort of scholars!

Erin Pevan

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September 29, 2016

Introducing Erin Pevan

September 29, 2016 | By | No Comments

Hei sann alle sammen! My name is Erin Pevan and I am one of the new CHI fellows for the 2016-2017 Academic Year. I’m a second year graduate student in Anthropology, currently working on finishing a Master’s degree before I delve head-on into the PhD. I’m a bit of anomaly in the department, a jack-of-all-trades kind of person, so my research and interests and experiences are diverse and expound. In addition to the CHI Fellowship, I am also a Bailey Scholars Program graduate fellow/convener and a TA in the department of Anthropology.

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Nikki Silva

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September 29, 2016

Re-Introducing Nikki Silva

September 29, 2016 | By | No Comments

Hi everyone! I’m Nikki Silva and I’m one of the returning CHI Fellows for the 2017/2018 fellowship. I’m a 5th year PhD Student in Anthropology and my research attempts to answer the question: How does culture contact/interaction between two groups of people affect the creation of a new community and the use of space at this new location? My work will explore the effects of cultural interaction on the spatial dimension of community by using a multi-scalar approach to site structure.

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Last year I collaborated with other returning CHI fellow Autumn Beyer on the Mapping Morton Village project, an interactive map of the Morton Village archaeological site, where Autumn and I will both do our dissertation research. The project’s goal was to provide background on the Morton Village archaeological project and also educate visitors about some basics of archaeology.

My CHI project this year will focus on building a web resource on Oneota Archaeology, which will include a map, citations, and other information for scholars interested in this topic. It will be a big project and I will only be able to complete one portion of it during the fellowship, but I look forward to continuing the project after the fellowship ends.

Autumn Beyer

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September 28, 2016

Re-Introducing Autumn Beyer

September 28, 2016 | By | No Comments

Hello again! I’m happy to announce that I am one of the returning CHI fellows. In case you are not familiar with the CHI blog, I’ll first give you some background on my personal research and my previous CHI project, before delving into my plans for this year.

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